Matcha Bundt Cake

Matcha Bundt Cake

/
/
/

Matcha has a sweetness to it, a slight earthiness and a subtle umami hint. It is wonderful on its own, vigorously frothed it becomes a beautiful jade green and is almost creamy in its texture. Culinary grade matcha can also be used to make delicious matcha flavoured treats, like this Matcha Bundt Cake. Wonderfully moist, sweetened with honey and gluten-free it is the perfect cake to have also side tea, after dinner for dessert. 

Kenko Matcha and a Matcha Bundt Cake
Matcha Bundt Cake cut in half

Matcha 

Matcha is powdered tencha, which is a shade-grown tea, that is steamed and dried to a flat leaf. The stem of the leaf is removed and then milled into a fine tea powder that becomes matcha. Culinary matcha is often produced from tea leaves that are picked later in the season. This matcha (culinary) is not as sweet and has a softer taste t it as there are less l-theanine, chlorophyll and other phytonutrients then you would find in a ceremonial grade tea. 

Some Culinary grade matcha may actually be produced from Sencha, which is a sun-grown tea, it is not a true matcha tea, though it can also be made into a powder. The nutritional quantities of this type of tea will also be far fewer than tencha as it is not shade grown. 

I used Kenko brand culinary and ceremonial matcha. I baked the cake using culinary matcha and use the ceremonial grade to sprinkle over the cake as it has a more refined taste. 

Close up of Matcha Bundt Cake
Side of Matcha Bundt Cake

Matcha Bundt Cake

Delicious, gluten-free matcha bundt cake. A gentle antioxidant hit, in a slightly sweet and moist cake. Can easily be made Vegan. 

Course Dessert
Cuisine Gluten-free, Healthy, Paleo
Keyword bundt cake, Matcha bundt cake
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 8 servings
Calories 290 kcal

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup of nut milk (room temperature) I use homemade almond milk
  • 1/4 cup of coconut oil (melted)
  • 1 2/3 cup almond flour
  • 1/4 cup arrowroot starch
  • 2/3 cup rice flour
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp matcha powder (culinary grade) + plus more for garnish

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. 

  2. Grease a 10-inch bundt pan, I use an avocado spray. 

  3. In a large mixing bowl combine the dry ingredients; almond flour, arrowroot starch, rice flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and matcha powder. Whisk well to combine. 

  4. In a smaller mixing bowl combine the wet ingredients; Nut milk, coconut oil, honey, eggs and vanilla. Whisk well to combine. 

  5. Make a well in the dry ingredients bowl and slowly add in the wet ingredients. Mix well, making sure that there are no dry clumps especially at the bottom of the bowl. 

  6. Before pouring in the batter, make sure that no oil is pooling at the bottom of the bundt pan. If it is, use a pastry brush and gently spread the oil about the pan. Make sure the whole surface of the pan is covered. 

    Use a mixture of matcha powder and almond flour to coat the inside of the pan. I would start with 1 tsp of matcha powder to 1 tbsp of almond flour. Make sure the inside of the pan is completely covered. 

  7. Pour the batter into the bundt pan and place it in the oven for between 40- 50 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean from the center. 

  8. Let the cake cool for ten (10) minutes before flipping it onto a wire rack or plate. Gently tap the sides and remove the pan. 

  9. Dust the Matcha Bundt Cake with a little matcha powder. Serve with fruit or coconut whipped cream. 

  10. The cake can be stored at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 

I used brown rice flour for the bundt cake so it came out a little darker, a white rice flour would be best especially to see the green colour. It is such a nice light cake, the honey gives it that perfect amount of sweetness, the matcha combines so well with it, it is really lovely. 

Slice of Matcha Bundt cake
Amanda Filipowicz
Amanda Filipowicz

Amanda Filipowicz is a certified nutritional practitioner (CNP) with a bachelor in environmental studies (BES) from York University. She also has certification in clinical detoxification, prenatal and postnatal care as well as nutrition for mental health. She has a decade of experience in nutritional health and is a lifelong proponent of eating healthy.

Leave a Reply

  Subscribe  
Notify of

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This